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3D printing ‘bigger than internet’

Proponents of 3D printing say it has the potential to alter radically a number of industries. Peter Marsh, FT manufacturing editor, talks to one such supporter - Abe Reichental of US-based 3D Systems - to find out how it works and if it really is a ‘disruptive technology’

(Source: video.ft.com)

Engineers pave the way towards 3D printing of personal electronics

Scientists are developing new materials which could one day allow people to print out custom-designed personal electronics such as games controllers which perfectly fit their hand shape.

Hybrid 3D printer creates implantable cartilage that could be used in humans

Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have created a hybrid 3D printer that’s able to manufacture implantable cartilage for regenerative use in patients. The team combined traditional inkjet printing with electrospinning, a method that uses an electrical current to create extremely fine fibers from plastic polymers. The fibers can be manipulated to form a porous structure, attracting healthy cartilage cells that grow around the implant. Better yet, the artificial cartilage is able to withstand everyday use while those healthy cells are generated. The material was tested in mice over a period of eight weeks and found to have “enhanced mechanical properties” compared to traditional printed solutions while also sharing traits “typical of elastic cartilage.” The printer is still confined to the laboratory for further testing, but the goal is to one day use the printed cartilage in human patients.
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Hybrid 3D printer creates implantable cartilage that could be used in humans

Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have created a hybrid 3D printer that’s able to manufacture implantable cartilage for regenerative use in patients. The team combined traditional inkjet printing with electrospinning, a method that uses an electrical current to create extremely fine fibers from plastic polymers. The fibers can be manipulated to form a porous structure, attracting healthy cartilage cells that grow around the implant. Better yet, the artificial cartilage is able to withstand everyday use while those healthy cells are generated. The material was tested in mice over a period of eight weeks and found to have “enhanced mechanical properties” compared to traditional printed solutions while also sharing traits “typical of elastic cartilage.” The printer is still confined to the laboratory for further testing, but the goal is to one day use the printed cartilage in human patients.

Anthony Atala: Printing a human kidney

Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney. Using similar technology, Dr. Atala’s young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage.

Anthony Atala asks, “Can we grow organs instead of transplanting them?” His lab at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is doing just that — engineering over 30 tissues and whole organs.

Virginia Tech: 3D Printing Station from virginiatech on Vimeo.

Virginia Tech: 3D Printing Station

The DreamVendor is an interactive 3D printing station for Virginia Tech students to enable them to quickly fabricate prototypes for their academic, and even personal, design projects.

The station is part of the Department of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech.

3-D Printer Makes Customized Cookies

The researchers at Cornell University have been cooking up a new appliance for your home — a 3-D food printer. They’ve been experimenting with all kinds of goo, including cheese, cookie dough and liquid turkey.

A room for making anything: Inside MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms

What is the best way to create objects from bits? That’s a key question at the Media Lab’s Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA), where researchers explore new ways to turn digital information (bits) into physical objects (atoms) and vice-versa.
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A room for making anything: Inside MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms

What is the best way to create objects from bits? That’s a key question at the Media Lab’s Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA), where researchers explore new ways to turn digital information (bits) into physical objects (atoms) and vice-versa.

The DIY laser cutter made out of wood

These are great days for makers. Affordable 3D printers and CNC mills are popping up everywhere, opening up new worlds of production to wide ranges of designers. However, one major tool still hasn’t received a DIY overhaul: the laser cutter. Maybe people are sensitive because Goldfinger tried to cut James Bond in half with one, but all that changes now with Patrick Hood-Daniel’s new Kickstarter, “ Build Your Own Laser Cutter.”

I’m absolutely loving this boom in affordable CAM machines. One day I’d like to have a workshop full of them. View high resolution

The DIY laser cutter made out of wood

These are great days for makers. Affordable 3D printers and CNC mills are popping up everywhere, opening up new worlds of production to wide ranges of designers. However, one major tool still hasn’t received a DIY overhaul: the laser cutter. Maybe people are sensitive because Goldfinger tried to cut James Bond in half with one, but all that changes now with Patrick Hood-Daniel’s new Kickstarter, “ Build Your Own Laser Cutter.

I’m absolutely loving this boom in affordable CAM machines. One day I’d like to have a workshop full of them.

Aspiring gun maker has 3D-printer revoked over plans to print firearms

Law student Cody Wilson believes more guns will make the world ‘a better place.’ The manufacturer of his 3D printer wants nothing to do with it — they repossessed their equipment.

What do you guys think of this? Regardless of whether you’re against firearms or not, I feel the company has every right to back out.

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